Brauner International Corporation
Licensed Customs Brokers and International Freight Forwarders since 1931. FMC #575. CTPAT certified.

Storm warning

October 28, 2012

We want to inform you that a large storm is scheduled to hit the eastern seaboard of the United States on October 29th. This storm is expected to cause electrical outages resulting in loss of computer and phone communications; possibly for several days. If we are affected by the anticipated outages we will respond to you as so possible.

Retroactive Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) Billing Correction

CBP has issued CSMS #12-000275 dated July 17,2012 to further clarify billing procedures for retroactive MPF.

“The week of June 11, 2012, CBP began billing for the increase in merchandise processing fee
(MPF), as established by H.R. 2832 on October 21, 2011. The purpose of this message is to notify the trade that certain entry summaries with entry dates prior to October 1, 2011 were billed in error. Entry summaries with an entry date on or after October 1, 2011 (as defined by 19 CFR 141.68) are subject to the MPF rate of 0.3464 percent (.003464).

CBP will reliquidate those entry summaries billed in error to reflect the original MPF rate. Affected entry summaries for which the importer has already paid the bill will receive a refund. The reliquidation will cancel bills on those entry summaries for which the importer has not paid the bill. However, CBP recommends that importers monitor their entry summary liquidations and bills closely. Erroneously issued bills associated with these entry summaries should not be paid. CBP will complete the reliquidations no later than October 6, 2012.

Please note that incorrectly assessed MPF is also a protestable issue.”

If you have additional questions please call our office at 201-333-5400

Retroactive Merchandise Processing Fee (MPF) Billing

The week of June 11, 2012, CBP began the retroactive MPF billing process for merchandise entered October 1, 2011 through November 4, 2011.

Background

Trade Adjustment Assistance Extension Act of 2011 (TAA) was signed into law on October 21, 2011. This law increased the merchandise processing fee (MPF) rate for formal entries from 0.21% (.0021) to 0.3464% (.003464), effective October 1, 2011. The minimum and maximum fees, $25 and $485 respectively, did not change. CBP automated system programming was completed on November 5, 2011. CBP advised the trade that we would bill importers for those entries entered October 1 through November 4, 2011; however, we were unable to begin billing until the refund processing was completed for the Generalized System of Preferences, Andean Trade Preference Act, and the Andean Trade Promotion, and Drug Eradication Act retroactive renewals, also passed on October 21, 2011.

See also Cargo Systems Messaging Service notices CSMS ( CSMS 12-000229 ) , ( 11-000274 ) , and ( 11-000262 ) .

Additional details

The retroactive increase affected over 650,000 entry summaries, and CBP will process the bills in batches from June to September 2012. CBP will not bill for de minimis amounts (i.e., increases of less than $20.00). CBP will generate bills for entries that are not liquidated and are not flagged for reconciliation. Please note that multiple bills may be paid with one check, as long as a supplemental spreadsheet is provided, which lists each bill number and bill amount. CBP will not assess interest on bill amounts for the increased MPF.

President Obama Signs GSP and FTA legislation

The president signed legislation renewing the General System of Preferences (GSP, the Colombia, Panama and South Korea Free Trade Agreements (FTAs),

US-Colombia FTA:

The agreement has been ratified. Implementation will be delayed until certain elements of the Labor Action Plan been implemented.

U.S.-Panama FTA

This agreement has been ratified and is expected to be implemented shortly.

US-Korea FTA

As of this date it is awaiting ratification by Korea.

TAA Expansion
Trade Adjustment Assistance (“TAA”):
The TAA program, in existence since the 1960’s, its goal it to help workers negatively impacted by imports. It provides health care benefits , education, and tax credits while workers seed new employment. Eligible workers are assisted finding new jobs with compensation comparable to their prior employment.

Useful Information & 10 + 2

This area is used for useful info:

Informed Compliance – Log on to CBP’s web site and take some time to make yourself familiar with it. Look for areas that apply to your business. If your not sure what to click on, feel free to send us an e-mail and ask us to recommend links to items that would be of interest to you.

Brauner International Corporation is dedicated to service.

We will be working to assist with the
10 + 2 / Importer Security Filing that will be going in to effect Jan 29 2008. Please feel free to contact us for assistance.

The ten required elements are:

(1) Manufacturer (or supplier) name and address.
Name and address of the entity that last manufactures, assembles, produces, or grows the commodity or name and address of the supplier of the finished goods in the country from which the goods are leaving. In the alternative, the name and address of the manufacturer (or supplier) that is currently required by the import laws, rules and regulations of the United States (i.e., entry procedures) may be provided (this is the information that is used to create the existing manufacturer identification (MID) number for entry purposes).
(2) Seller name and address.
Name and address of the last known entity by whom the goods are sold or agreed to be sold. If the goods are to be imported otherwise than in pursuance of a purchase, the name and address of the owner of the goods must be provided.
—————————————————————————————————————- \3\ The party required for this element is consistent with the
information required on the invoice of imported merchandise. See 19 CFR 141.86(a)(2).
—————————————————————————————————————-
(3) Buyer name and address.
Name and address of the last known entity to whom the goods are sold or agreed to be sold. If the goods are to be imported otherwise than in pursuance of a purchase, the name and address of the owner of the goods must be provided.\4\
—————————————————————————————————————- \4\ The party required for this element is consistent with the
information required on the invoice of imported merchandise. See 19 CFR 141.86(a)(2).
—————————————————————————————————————-
(4) Ship to name and address.
Name and address of the first deliver-to party scheduled to physically receive the goods after the goods have been released from customs custody.

(5) Container stuffing location.
Name and address(es) of the physical location(s) where the goods were stuffed into the container. For break bulk shipments, the name and address(es) of the physical location(s) where the goods were made ``ship ready’‘ must be provided.

(6) Consolidator (stuffer) name and address.
Name and address of the party who stuffed the container or arranged for the stuffing of the container. For break bulk shipments, the name and address of the party who made the goods ``ship ready’‘ or the party who arranged for the goods to be made ``ship ready’‘ must be provided.

(7) Importer of record number
/ FTZ applicant identification number. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) number, Employer Identification Number (EIN), Social Security Number (SSN), or CBP assigned number of the entity liable for payment of all duties and responsible for meeting all statutory and regulatory requirements incurred as a result of importation. For goods intended to be delivered to an FTZ, the IRS number, EIN, SSN, or CBP assigned number of the party filing the FTZ documentation with CBP must be provided. The importer of record number for Importer Security Filing purposes is the same as ``importer number’‘ on CBP Form 3461.

(8) Consignee number(s). Internal Revenue Service (IRS)number,
Employer Identification Number (EIN), Social Security Number (SSN), or CBP assigned number of the individual(s) or firm(s) in the United States on whose account the merchandise is shipped. This element is the same as the ``consignee number’‘ on CBP Form 3461.

(9) Country of origin.
Country of manufacture, production, or growth of the article, based upon the import laws, rules and regulations of the United States. This element is the same as the ``country of origin’‘ on CBP Form 3461.

(10) Commodity HTSUS number.
Duty/statistical reporting number under which the article is classified in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). The HTSUS number is required to be provided to the 6 digit level. The HTSUS number may be provided up to the 10 digit level. This element is the same as the ``H.S. number’‘ on CBP Form 3461 and can only be used for entry purposes, if it is provided at the 10 digit level or greater.

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Locations

Main

66 York St.,
Jersey City, NJ 07302

T (201) 333-5400
F (201) 333-4030

JFK

146-35 167th St.
Suite 202
Jamaica, NY 11434

T (718) 656-5680
F (718) 656-6824

Miami

2335 N.W. 107th Ave
Suite 2M35, Box # 102
Miami, FL 33172

T (305) 477-8097
F (305) 477-8170